Music Education

​“It is beneficial for the artist if his human dimension is grounded in educational work that connects the artist to his audience in an organic manner,” says Fleischer. Indeed, in addition to composition, Tsippi Fleischer is one of the most active contributors to musical education in Israel. She was one of the founders of the Pedagogical Council of the Faculty of Music Education at Levinsky College, taught and supervised generations of music students at the Institute, and lectured for enrichment courses and teacher’s continuing education in music courses on behalf of the Ministry of Education’s supervision on music education.

 

Her educational work during over 40 years of teaching at the Levinsky College of Education became a trademark among her colleagues and students. Fleischer published many studies in which she described her educational approach, characterized by intensifying musical experience through depth and precision in theoretical-musical analysis, affording complementary knowledge from extra-musical disciplines (history, society, literature, philosophy) and cultivating personal and professional dedication of teachers to their students, children and adults alike. “As an abstract art, it [music] requires both precision and depth . . . The progression from sensory impression to an inspection of the elements of the work is especially important, and back – to enjoyment already nourished by the accumulated layers of knowledge . . . In order to complete the musical picture, effort must be devoted even towards the extra-musical picture [of] spiritual content that joins the sounds themselves in a constant flow . . . This pedantic approach to the countless musical aspects draws the student nearer to expert knowledge. . . [together with] a belief in the strongest personal connection between teacher and student.”

 

Posters announcing the meetings as part of the “Composers in Search of their Roots” program
 ​Tape jacket from a recording of the program “Composers in Search of their Roots,” cassette tape from the 1980s.​​
Among her initiatives to foster musical education in Israel is the project “Composers in Search of their Roots,” which she produced during the years 1983-1987. In the framework of this project, supported by the Ministry of Education and Culture’s “Omanut La'am” (art for the people), The America-Israel Cultural Foundation, and the Histadrut Labor Union, Fleischer joined forces with composers Daniel Galai and Meir Mindel in a program called “Who’s Afraid of Modern Music”?
 
The three defined it as a “Project noted for its pioneering approach, bold social interaction between all its components, the repeat performances, and its non-elitist character. Indeed, together with the performing musicians, they travelled up and down Israel to dozens of urban and rural localities, from Kiryat Shmoneh and Kfar Blum in the north to Yerucham and the localities of the Arava and Eilat in the south.
 
The musical program included a live musical performance of the chamber music composed by the three, as well as works of key composers of the 20th century. During the concerts, the composers and musicians explained the varied works and held discussions with the audience – children, youth and adults alike, moderated by Fleischer.
 
 
Fleischer wrote about the idea of narrated concerts, at the time a pioneering program and first of its type in Israel (Israeli Composers League Bulletin, 1984): “Since I founded the group “Composers in Search of their Roots” . . . an encouraging truth is revealing itself to me: It is possible to distribute contemporary Israeli music widely, in a way that emphasizes it . . . We are penetrating a most diverse audience, exposing live concerts with many demonstrations and explanations . . . These encounters are extremely valuable. They breathe life into our works and also serve as a bridge between pubic concert-audiences and the goals of Contemporary music as a whole. . . The encounter with us has elicited responses from many people in the concerts, both in emotion and thought.”     
 
An additional key educational initiative of Tsippi Fleischer was “East and West in Music,” which operated during the years 1987-1989, for pupils and students, and dealt with Israel’s cultural pluralism. In this context, Fleischer conducted guided musical tours around the country: “The goal of the new series of lessons,” she wrote in her article, Opening a Wide Window onto Creativity in the Learner’s Heart – Reflections on the Tour of Jerusalem Sounds, is: "to ground the unique reflection made possible by the encounter of musical cultures of West and East at the Middle-Eastern seam line in our country . . . In the guided tours, I set a goal of mainly leading the students through an experience of unmediated acquaintance with the musical heritage of the Jewish ethnicities – in the context of the sacred (liturgy) and the profane . . .the Arabic influence on the amazing richly ornamented improvisations of the paytanim in the synagogue of the Aleppo community is prominent . . . in contrast with the adorned cantorial style of the Reform synagogue, adorned with characteristics of Western Classical music . . . and there is no avoiding enwrapping all of these with the chimes of the church bells and the calls of the muezzin . . . And anyone who has experienced the sounds of an ancient Eastern [Armenian] church permeate his ears understands exactly what combination of elements we are talking about . . . The mixing of the origins of East and West is piercing, and your breath is taken away by the abundance of musical traditions heard from every direction".
 
World Premier of the opera The Judgment of Solomon, performed by pupils at the Bible Lands Museum, Jerusalem (1996)
Tsippi Fleischer’s activity in the initiative was documented by art researcher Gideon Ofrat: “Western and Arab intonations and meter, Western and Oriental music scales, Jewish, Western and Eastern liturgical heritages – the uniting all of these and more in a single cultural-musical mélange became a first-rate educational challenge.”
 
 
 
Additional educational initiatives by Tsippi Fleischer tied together broad contexts of the Hebrew folksong: its inter-disciplinary potential (her article Hebrew Song as a Tool for Multidisciplinary Education); the Hebrew folksong as an essential building-block in preschool education (her article “Children’s Songs: Old and New”); the repertoire of old holiday songs in Hebrew together with those composed by contemporary rock and pop artists; the context of music and the Bible as a fused entity (her article “Music as a Bridge between Judaism and Art”) and developing an interdisciplinary kit for teachers of Bible, art and music based on her operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon, and more.  
 
 

​World Premier of the opera The Judgment of Solomon, performed by pupils at the Bible Lands Museum, Jerusalem (1996)

 

​Many of Tsippi Fleischer’s apprentices reached the pinnacle of musical activity in Israel, some in the realm of Classical music (conductor David Shalon; pianist and composer Ilan Rechtman; and composer Amnon Wolman), and others in the realm of light music, jazz and theater (the composer Yosef Hadar; composer and songwriter Dafna Eilat; composer and arranger David Kribushe; composer, arranger and singer Shlomo Gronich; composer, pianist and arranger Adi Rennert; musician, translator and editor Dori Parnes, musician and composer Yair Dalal; choral conductors Michael Shani, Naomi Faran, Maya Shavit, Ronit Shapira) and many others.

 

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  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • From the Interdisciplinary Kit for Teachers of Bible, Art and Music, based on the operatic scene The Judgment of Solomon by Tsippi Fleischer
  • • Letters from young and old listeners, after approaching the concerts of “Composers in Search of their Roots”
  • • Letters from young and old listeners, after approaching the concerts of “Composers in Search of their Roots”
  • • Letters from young and old listeners, after approaching the concerts of “Composers in Search of their Roots”
  • • Letters from young and old listeners, after approaching the concerts of “Composers in Search of their Roots”
  • • Letters from young and old listeners, after approaching the concerts of “Composers in Search of their Roots”
  • • Tsippi Fleischer’s article: “Children’s Songs: Old and New”
  • • Letter of Tsippi Fleischer to Yuval Shaked, summarizing the “Composers in Search of their Roots” project