Collections > Judaica > Ketubot > Above My Chiefest Joy > Venice, Italy, 1732

Venice, Italy, 1732

 

Venice, Italy, 1732

 
 

 

The connection between the marriage contract and the hope for the renewal of the Temple service in Jerusalem is expressed in this ketubah through drawings of the Sanctuary vessels in four medallions on the four corners of the frame. Pictures of the Sanctuary vessels on the ketubah are the continuation of an ancient Jewish decorative tradition. 

 

​In the first centuries, C.E. the Sanctuary vessels and the rituals in the Temple served as a foundation of Jewish art in Eretz Yisrael and outside of it. They adorned the mosaics in early synagogues, ceramic candle holders, coffins, the base of pillars, glass vessels, and more.  

 

The preoccupation with the image of Jerusalem and the Temple continued in medieval Jewish art as well. In miniatures on Hebrew manuscripts from various countries  Egypt, Spain, Germany and Italy  the Sanctuary vessels appear again and again as the expression of the longing for the redemption of Israel, the return to Zion and the renewal of the ritual service in the Temple that will be built in Jerusalem. 

 

In many ketubot that were written over the course of the 18th century, the Sanctuary vessels are integrated into the 12 signs of the zodiac drawn on the rectangular border that surrounds the written text of the ketubah. The Sanctuary vessels, which are described in the Book of Exodus, can be identified by their titles in the medallions: "the laver and its base" (Exodus 30:18), "the candelabra and its vessels" (Exodus, 25:31), "the ark of the cherubim" (Exodus 25: 10), "the showbread" (Exodus, 25:30).  

 

In other ketubot of this sort, in place of the Sanctuary vessels, the four medallions contain allegories about the four seasons. This is perhaps a hint that the Sanctuary vessels, when they are integrated into the zodiac, are considered an essential element of the yearly cycle, or, alternatively, to the strong connection in Jewish tradition between the Jewish holidays  specifically the Three Festivals of Pilgrimage when Jews would make pilgrimages to Jerusalem and the Temple  and the seasons of the year during which they were celebrated. 

 
  

 

Venice, Italy, 1732

Padua, Italy, 1722  Exhibition Home Venice, Italy, 1750 Venice, Italy, 1732  

 

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Venice, Italy, 1732The connection between the marriage contract and the hope for the renewal of the Temple service in Jerusalem is expressed in this ketubah via drawings of the Sanctuary vessels in four medallions on the four corners of the frame. Pictures of the Sanctuary vessels on the ketubah are the continuation of an ancient Jewish decorative tradition.
 
​In the first centuries, C.E. the Sanctuary vessels and the rituals in the Temple served as a foundation Jewish art in Eretz Yisrael and outside of it. They adorned the mosaics in early synagogues, ceramic candle holders, coffins, the base of pillars, glass vessels, and more.
 
The preoccupation with the image of Jerusalem and the Temple continued in medieval Jewish art as well. In miniatures on Hebrew manuscripts from various countries- from Egypt and Spain, from Germany and Italy, the Sanctuary vessels appear again and again as the expression of the longing for the redemption of Israel and the return to Zion and the renewal of the ritual service in the Temple that will be built in Jerusalem.
 
In many ketubot that were written over the course of the 18th century, the Sanctuary vessels are integrated into the 12 signs of the zodiac drawn on the rectangular border that surrounds the written text of the ketubah. The Sanctuary vessels, which are described in the Book of Exodus, can be identified by their titles in the medallions: "the laver and its base" (Exodus 30:18), "the candelabra and its vessels" (Exodus, 25:31), "the ark of the cherubim" (Exodus 25: 10), "the showbread" (Exodus, 25:30). In other ketubot of this sort, in place of the Sanctuary vessels, the four medallions contain allegories about the four seasons.  This is perhaps a hint, that the Sanctuary vessels, when they are integrated into the zodiac, are considered an essential element of the yearly cycle, or, alternatively, to the strong connection in Jewish tradition between the Jewish holidays- specifically the Three Festivals of Pilgrimage when Jews would make pilgrimages to Jerusalem and the Temple- and the seasons of the year during which they were celebrated.