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Jerusalem, Eretz Yisrael, 1920

 

Jerusalem, Eretz Yisrael, 1920

 
 

 

Despite the simplicity of this ketubah, it bears the clear mark of Jerusalem where it was created.

 

On the top of the ketubah are two small stamped pictures; on the right, the conventional depiction of Jerusalem  a view of the Temple Mount from the Mount of Olives, a depiction of the Western Wall with the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the Dome of the Rock and a row of cypress trees above them. Under the picture appear the words: “The Western Wall”. On the left is a picture of structures in the Old City of Jerusalem and identifying words: “The Holy City Zion and the Tombs of the House of David”. Stamped in the center, between the two pictures, are the words: “The signature of the Committee of the Kolelot of Safaradim in the Holy City of Jerusalem, may she be built and established, amen” (in Hebrew, French and Arabic). Underneath, in large, bolded letters, appears the prophecy of Haggai about the greatness and glory of the Temple that will be built during the days of the Messiah: “The glory of this latter house shall be greater than that of the former” (Haggai 2: 9).


At the top, in the form of an arch, appears a blessing from the Book of Ruth: “The LORD make the woman that is come into thy house like Rachel and like Leah, which two did build the house of Israel” (Ruth 4: 11). This refers to the newly wed couple. The blessing was originally said during the marriage ceremony of Ruth and Boaz, one of the most important couples in Jewish tradition, who are represented in the sources in an idyllic light, as a symbol and example of a blessed married life. Their marriage led to the birth of David the King. In addition, the matriarchs Rachel and Leah who built “the house of Israel” are mentioned.

 

The connection between the private marriage ceremony and the national longing for the establishment of the messianic Temple and the revival of the Jewish nation is expressed through the combination of words and pictures from Jerusalem.

 

 
 
  

 

Jerusalem, Eretz Yisrael, 1920

Jerusalem, Eretz Yisrael, 1896  Exhibition Home Aden, Yemen, 1925 Jerusalem, Eretz Yisrael, 1920  

 

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Jerusalem, Eretz Yisrael, 1920Despite the simplicity of this ketubah it bears the clear mark of Jerusalem, where it was created. On the top of the ketubah there are two small stamped pictures: on the right, the conventional depiction of Jerusalem- a view of the Temple Mount from the Mount of Olives, a depiction of the Western Wall with the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the Dome of the Rock, a row of cypress trees above them- appears. Under the picture the words “The Western Wall” appear. On the left, there is a picture of structures in the Old City of Jerusalem and identifying words: “The Holy City Zion and the Tombs of the House of David”. Stamped in the center, between the two pictures, are the words, “The signature of the Committee of the Kolelot  of Safaradim in the Holy City of Jerusalem, may she be built and established, amen” (in Hebrew, French and Arabic). Underneath, in large, bolded letters the prophecy of the Haggai about the greatness and glory of the Temple that will be built during the days of the Messiah appears: “The glory of this latter house shall be greater than that of the former” (Haggai 2: 9)

At the top, in the form of an arch, a blessing from the Book of Ruth appears: “The LORD make the woman that is come into thy house like Rachel and like Leah, which two did build the house of Israel” (Ruth 4: 11). This refers to the new couple. The blessing was originally said during the marriage ceremony of one of the most important couples in Jewish tradition: Ruth and Boaz, who are represented in the sources in an idyllic light, as a symbol and example of a blessed married life. Their marriage led to the birth of the King David. Likewise, the matriarchs Rachel and Leah who built “the house of Israel” are mentioned. The connection between the private marriage ceremony and the national longing for the establishment of the messianic Temple and the revival of the Jewish nation is expressed through the combination of words and pictures from Jerusalem.